Reading difficulties
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Reading difficulties diagnosis, correction, and remediation. by International Reading Association.

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Published in Newark, Del .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Reading -- Remedial teaching

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementWilliam K. Durr, editor.
ContributionsDurr, William Kirtley, 1924- ed.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsLB1050.5 .I5
The Physical Object
Paginationvii, 276 p.
Number of Pages276
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4882393M
LC Control Number76011299

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Locating and Correcting Reading Difficulties (10th Edition) 10th Edition by Ward Cockrum (Author), James L. Shanker (Author) out of 5 stars 23 ratings. ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important? ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. Cited by: Read the book to understand why your child is struggling, and how to help. Our short Amazon bestseller covers the actual causes of reading difficulty (like whole word sight-reading, eye-tracking issues, weak working memory, and more) – all for the cost of a couple Starbucks coffees!   Summer Reading on Reading Difficulties Thank You, Mr. Falker by Patricia Polacco: A picture book? Yes. This heartwarming story, inspired by the author’s own struggle with dyslexia as a child, features an isolated student picked on by peers for Author: Jessica Hamman. Difficulties with Reading What mystifies many parents is where and why the reading process breaks down. Although, problems may occur in any area, decoding, comprehension, or retention, the root of.

As a reading specialist I have found "Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children" a valuable resource, and have referred to it often when authoring my latest book geared to parents of preschoolers entitled "Secrets to Reading Success: from the Early Years to First Grade." Every educator who works with young children should have a copy of /5(5). Annotation. Reading and Learning Difficulties is a comprehensive guide to teaching reading more effectively to a wide range of children. The book presents a variety of research-supported approaches to teaching that have been designed to make learning to read easier and more successful for all children. By examining the way readers process text and identifying the knowledge and skills needed to. Assessing Reading Comprehension and Related Skills Book This module is comprised of two sessions Module Effective Approaches for Preventing Reading Difficulties. he purpose of this book is to help the many children, adolescents, and adults who encounter difficulty with reading. Designed as a text for both undergrad-uate and graduate students, Reading Problems: Assessment and Teaching Strategies guides prospective and present teachers in assessing and teaching students who are.

When a preschool child's home language is not primarily English, the ease of learning to read printed English is likely to be impeded to some extent, particularly if reading instruction in English begins before the child has acquired oral proficiency in English (see August and Hakuta, ). Dyslexia is a learning disability that manifests itself as a difficulty with word decoding and reading fluency. Comprehension may be affected as a result of difficulties with decoding, but is not a primary feature of dyslexia. It is separate and distinct from reading difficulties resulting from other causes, such as a non-neurological deficiency with vision or hearing, or from poor or. This resource book presents sets of instructional strategies for beginning reading and is designed for classroom teachers to use with students who are at risk for reading difficulties, including dyslexia. When students struggle with learning to read, they need additional instruction focused on .   However, Dr. David Kilpatrick’s book entitled Essentials of Assessing, Preventing, and Overcoming Reading Difficulties () educates his readers that phonemic awareness instruction which typically concludes at the end of first grade with establishing students’ phoneme blending and segmenting skills is not sufficient, but must extend to.